Safety on the Slopes of Beaver Creek, Colorado

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Home > Colorado > Colorado Cities > Beaver Creek > Winter Activities > Safety    [ bookmark this page ]

Page Title: Safety on the Slopes of Beaver Creek, Colorado
Page Synopsis: An overview of safety issues on the slopes at Beaver Creek, Colorado.



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Safety on the Slopes

It's no surprise that, as a leader in the snowsports industry, Beaver Creek also is recognized as a leader in promoting responsible skiing and snowboarding on its slopes. In fact, the resort received top honors from the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA) Safety Program contest.  Beaver Creek and the rest of the Colorado snowsports industry have made a commitment to increase their efforts in promoting safe skiing and snowboarding.

Beaver Creek Safety Initiatives
The Beaver Creek Skier and Snowboarder Responsibility Program is designed to communicate, educate and enforce the basics of responsible, courteous skiing and riding. The following initiatives are in place to instill a sense of personal responsibility in skiers and snowboarders who use Beaver Creek Mountain to recreate.

  • The Yellow Jackets A group of ski patrollers and mountain hosts chosen to participate in the resort's on-mountain safety initiative.  Yellow Jackets patrol the mountain, helping to educate guests and enforce Your Responsibility Code, monitor speed in high-traffic areas, and assist guests with questions or needs.  Beaver Creek's Yellow Jacket team is proactive in rewarding positive displays of points outlined in Your Responsibility Code.
  • Mountain Safety Center Located adjacent to the Centennial Express lift (#6), and staffed each day, Beaver Creek's Mountain Safety Center offers a place where guests can get information about skier and snowboarder responsibility and provide feedback or record complaints.
  • Dusty the Safety Eagle Dusty is Beaver Creek's new spokes-eagle for the resort's Yellow Jackets on-mountain safety program. Dusty has been living on Beaver Creek Mountain for many years, assisting ski patrol and the resort's Yellow Jackets by watching for skiers and snowboarders in need. Throughout the season, Dusty can be found greeting guests, reminding children of "Your Responsibility Code" and spreading the word of safety on the slopes.  He makes special trips to Children's Ski and Snowboard School, Spruce Saddle and other mountain locations, assisting the Yellow Jackets with their daily duties. Dusty also visits local schools with Beaver Creek's Yellow Jackets and ski patrollers, helping to educate kids about on-mountain safety.
  • Space Not Speed Vail Resorts introduced this new slogan during the past winter season, sparking renewed awareness of on-mountain safety among skiers and riders at each of the four resorts.  Space Not Speed means, give other skiers, riders and objects space on the mountain and maintain a controlled speed at all times.
  • Increased Signage Designated on-mountain Slow Zones and terrain parks received a boost in signage to help increase awareness among skiers and riders.
  • Points of Your Responsibility Code On-mountain electronic signs, daily grooming reports and the daily snow report message all include the points of Your Responsibility Code.
  • Reckless or Inappropriate Behavior Individuals who receive a warning are issued a Responsibility Code Awareness Card with the seven points of Your Responsibility Code.
  • Education Continued teaching of responsibility on the mountain in all ski and snowboard group and private lessons through the Beaver Creek Ski and Snowboard School. Children get help with learning about safety and responsibility from Dusty the Safety Eagle, who visits the Children's Ski and Snowboard School Center.

Your Responsibility Code
There are elements of risk in skiing and snowboarding that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce.

  1. Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. Do not stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging onto a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

Any employee in uniform, not just ski patrollers, may suspend or revoke the lift ticket or season pass of a skier or snowboarder who speeds or demonstrates reckless and/or inappropriate behavior on the mountain.

In addition to Your Responsibly Code, Vail Resorts also has established Freeriding Terrain Responsibility Code. Freeriding terrain includes the pipes and features within the terrain park. In an effort to increase safety awareness in the park, a set of instructions and warnings have implemented to help promote the safety of each person in the park and pipe.

  • Freeriding Terrain contains man-made and natural terrain variations.
  • Freeriding terrain changes constantly due to weather and use.
  • Inspect the pipe and all features before using as well as throughout the day.
  • In jumping and using the terrain, skier/rider assumes to the risk of serious injury.
  • Be courteous and respect others.
  • One user at a time on all features
  • Look before You Leap!—Never jump blindly and use a spotter when necessary.
  • It is your responsibility to control your body on the ground and in the air.
  • Always clear the landing quickly
  • Always ride or ski in control and within your ability.

Helmets
At Vail Resorts, our position regarding helmets is to strongly recommend their use for children ages 12 and under while participating in ski and snowboard school activities.  To that end, any parent not wishing for their child to wear a helmet while in ski and snowboard school will sign a release to that effect.  Otherwise all children will wear helmets while in ski and snowboard school at Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone and Heavenly.





Home > Colorado > Colorado Cities > Beaver Creek > Winter Activities > Safety    [ bookmark this page ]

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